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:: About Our Programs

VISUAL ARTS PROGRAM

Associate Professor: Jeffrey A. Chapp, M.F.A.

Visual Arts Major

Barnes Foundation Collaboration

Studio Arts Track

Museum Studies Track

Visual Arts Major Requirements
Admission
Visual Arts Courses
Art Studios
Visual Arts Minor

VISUAL ARTS MISSION STATEMENT
The mission of the Visual Arts Program within the Department of Visual and Performing Arts is to provide academic, aesthetic, and technical challenges through a diverse curriculum to talented students who are interested in the production, analysis and promotion of the Visual Arts. It is our goal to offer well-organized curricula in a nurturing environment where our students are stimulated to ask questions, enabled to solve problems, and challenged to become competitive in their chosen field of study. The Visual Arts Program provides our students with an understanding of the important role played by African Americans in the arts and to evolve that knowledge into an understanding of their role in the arts within a technologically infused global environment.

VISUAL ARTS MAJOR
The Visual Arts major offers two tracks – Studio Arts and Museum Studies. Students are prepared for a wide range of opportunities, including entry-level employment in various departments of museums, galleries and other cultural enterprises, and careers as independent artists or graphic designers. Both tracks include courses that will prepare our graduates to meet entrance requirements for graduate programs in Museum Studies, Art History, Art Education and Studio Arts.

All Visual Arts majors benefit from core coursework that provides a solid foundation in studio design basics, media manipulation, the computer as a tool for art and design, the history of world art, and the scope of museum studies. The curriculum includes lecture and studio courses coupled with out-of-classroom experiences geared toward analyzing diverse art forms and understanding the role museums play in the preservation of artistic heritage and the presentation of contemporary visual art.

Students select a plan of study with a faculty advisor based on progressive requirements in Museum Studies and Art History courses or a Studio discipline. Within Studio Arts a concentration focus in painting, printmaking, graphic design or ceramics is selected. A Museum Studies direction may encompass interests in exhibition curating, arts administration, research, or communications and publicity.

Barnes Foundation Collaboration
A unique feature of our program is our collaboration with the Barnes Foundation.

“The Barnes Foundation houses one of the finest collections of French early Modern and Post-impressionist paintings in the world. An extraordinary number of masterpieces by Renoir, Cezanne and Matisse provide a depth of work by these artists unavailable elsewhere. The collection also includes works by Picasso, Seurat, Rousseau, Modigliani, Soutine, Monet, Manet, Degas and others. Art from around the globe is grouped with fine examples of antique furniture, ceramics, hand-wrought iron, and Native American jewelry. The Barnes Foundation is much more than an art collection. It is the vibrant reflection of a life inspired by humanity and creative expression.” (The Barnes Foundation)

During the 1940s, Dr. Horace Mann Bond, the president of Lincoln University, and Dr. Albert C. Barnes, the founder and creator of The Barnes Foundation met. Dr. Bond had a passion for delivering quality higher education to an underserved population, and Dr. Barnes had a passion for advancing the appreciation of art and advancing education to a people who were underserved.

The Visual Arts Program has worked collaboratively with the Barnes Foundation to develop a course offering university credits. This three (3) credit course covers select concepts from the Barnes Foundation’s Visual Literacy course, including an analysis of the “ensembles” arranged by Dr. Barnes. This course provides our students with an introduction to concepts put forth by Dr. Barnes to analyze artworks with a “heightened visual perception.”

Common courses for both tracks include the following:
• ART100-Fundamentals of 2-D Design
• ART101-Fundamentals of 3-D Design
• ART102-Introduction to Computer Arts
• ART103-Introduction to Color and Media
• ARH211-Art History I
• ARH212Art History II
• MSM210-Introduction to Museum Studies
• MSM218-Barnes History and Methodology

Art Studios
On the Lincoln University campus, the program is housed in Ware Center for the Fine Arts, a building that was recently renovated, with several top-of-the-line art labs and seminar rooms. They include a Ceramic Studio, 2D/3D Design Studio, Printmaking Studio, Painting/ Drawing Studio, a high-tech lecture room, and a 16-station Mac computer lab running OSX. The International Cultural Center (ICC) Gallery and the Lincoln University Collection of African Art and Material Culture serve as premier resources for research and hands-on experiential learning for our students.

Visual Arts Major Requirements

Admission

The program seeks to recruit students with strong academic skills interested in museum-related careers and those interested in pursuing studio art and design practice. The Visual Arts Program requests a writing sample/s (essay or term paper, beyond the general application essay) and digital images or an abbreviated original art/design portfolio of original art works. (Writing and art works are weighed according to program interests.)

Graduation Requirements

The following are the requirements for the Visual Arts major leading to the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree:

  1. Students must pass a Sophomore/Junior Review (third semester or equivalent for transfer students) of their art and activities, according to the plan of study and concentration developed with the student’s advisor. A Visual Arts Faculty committee of at least two evaluates student work. Students who do not pass the Sophomore Review may be directed to provisional remedies for a follow-up review, or directed to another major at that time.
  2. Students must complete all courses required by the university and those required for the Museum Studies or Studio Art curricula, according to specifications in the University Catalog operative the year the student declares the major.
  3. Students must maintain a minimum grade set by the university in all courses in the Major (University Catalog).
  4. Students must submit a writing portfolio in accordance with university and department requirements.
  5. Students must exhibit artwork and/or present a department lecture or project during the senior year.

Language Requirement •The Bachelor of Arts degree requires two years (four semesters) of a foreign language.

VISUAL ARTS MINOR
(For non-Visual Arts majors)

Departmental approval is required for students wishing to achieve a documented Visual Arts Minor. Interested students should schedule an appointment with the Chair of the Department or their designee to develop a plan of study regarding choice of courses and sequencing.

The Visual Arts minor requires (18) credit hours of area offerings: Four (4) required courses and (2) electives.

Courses required for the minor include:

ART100 Fundamentals of 2-D Design
-or- 3
ART101 Fundamentals of 3-D Design

ART102 Introduction to Computer Arts
-or- 3
ART103 Introduction to Color and Media

ARH211 History of Art I
-or- 3
ARH212 History of Art II

MSM210 Introduction to Museum Studies
-or- 3
MSM218 Barnes History and Methodology

Plus two elective Visual Arts courses beyond ARH 200* 6
Total Number of Credits 18 credits

*ART200 is suggested to fill a University core Humanities requirement, which will provide a good foundation for a Minor in Visual Art.

VISUAL ARTS MAJOR

Visual Arts Major – Studio Arts Track (B. A. or B. S.)
Students predominantly interested in practicing art in any of a variety of applications choose this track with a faculty advisor who will guide them toward an art concentration such as painting, printmaking, ceramics or graphic design, supported by coursework. Advisors also help students choose a complementary Minor in another department or coursework from other elective areas that may further their career goals.

Studio Arts Track Course Requirements

Studio Core 12 credits
ART100 Fundamentals of 2-D Design 3
ART101 Fundamentals of 3-D Design 3
ART102 Introduction to Computer Arts 3
ART103 Introduction to Media and Color 3

Studio Courses 21 credits
Four (4) 200 Level courses 12
ART205 Drawing I 3
ART210 Ceramics I 3
ART215 Printmaking I 3
ART220 Print Production: Graphic Arts I 3
ART225 Painting I 3

Two (2) 300 Level courses 6
ART305 Drawing II 3
ART310 Ceramics II 3
ART315 Printmaking II 3
ART320 Web Publication Design: Graphic Arts II 3
ART325 Painting II 3

One (1) 400 Level course 3
ART405 Drawing III 3
ART410 Ceramics III 3
ART415 Printmaking III 3
ART420 Layout and Typography: Graphic Arts III 3
ART425 Painting III 3

Art History 9 Credits
ARH211 Art History I 3
ARH212 Art History II 3

One (1) of the following courses: 3
ARH375 African American Art History
ARH376 African Art

Museum Studies 6 credits
MSM210 Introduction to Museums 3
MSM218 Barnes History and Methodology 3

Academic Enrichment 3 credits
ART-409-Senior Seminar 3

Total Credits 51 credits

Visual Arts Major – Museum Studies Track (B.A).
Students predominantly interested in working with art and artifacts in museums or galleries and/or research in visual arts areas choose this track with a faculty advisor who will guide them towards concentrations such as arts administration and promotion, art historical applications, or collections management, supported by coursework. Advisors also help students choose a complementary Minor in another department or coursework from other areas as electives that may further their goals, for example, Education, Communications or Anthropology. Those in the Museum Studies track are encouraged to choose ART electives.

Museum Studies Track Course Requirements

Studio Core 12 credits
ART100 Fundamentals of 2-D Design 3
ART101 Fundamentals of 3-D Design 3
ART102 Introduction to Computer Arts 3
ART103 Introduction to Media and Color 3

Art History Courses 15 credits
ARH211 Art History I 3
ARH212 Art History II 3
ARH216 Art Theory and Criticism 3
ARH375 African American Art History 3
ARH376 African Art 3

Museum Studies Courses 9 credits
MSM210 Introduction to Museums & Collections 3
MSM220 Collections Management and Care 3
MSM218 Barnes History and Methodology 3

Language Requirement for Museum Studies Track (B. A.) 8 credits
Intermediate Foreign Language 201 4
Intermediate Foreign Language 202 4

Academic Enrichment 6 credits
Study Abroad/Internship/Independent Study 3
ART/MSM 490 Senior Seminar 3

Total 50 credits

VISUAL ARTS COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

ARH 211 Art History I 3 credits
A survey of art from earliest examples to the Renaissance. Western and non-Western art will be examined.
Prerequisites: ENG 102

ARH 212 Art History II 3 credits
A survey of art from the Renaissance to present day. Western and non-Western art will be examined.
Prerequisites: ENG 102

ARH 216 Art Theory, Methodology and Criticism 3 credits
This course expands the student's ability to ascertain cultural meaning of art styles, forms, and specific works from different perspectives and to articulate critical opinions about them. The development of visual aesthetics, with emphasis on the contributions of major thinkers and the broad philosophical outlooks that have influenced them, is covered. Theoretical approaches to art exhibition and its effects on the messages of art are also explored. Diverse art examples across time and regions will be shown in class in tandem with theoretical discussion addressing the "big" questions about art: how can it be defined on collective and specific levels; what has been/should be its function; what propels its creation?
Prerequisites: ARH 211, ART 212 and ART 200 or permission of instructor, advisor and Chair.

ARH 375 African Art History 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the arts of Africa by presenting select information about the many varied cultures of the African Diaspora. The course will examine the role of art in Africa as its creation and use are manifested in the lifestyles, religions, philosophies, and methods of survival of the peoples of the continent. As the arts of Africa are an integral part of these aspects of traditional African society, they are also integrally related to one another. This course will study the interrelationships of as many various forms of art as possible including music, dance, sculpture, masks, textiles, architecture, and literature.
Prerequisites: ENG 102, ARH 211, ART 212 and ART 200 or permission of instructor, advisor and/or Chair.

ARH 376 African American Art History 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the visual arts created by artists of African descent in the Americas. The focus of the course will be an historical overview of African American art from the colonial period to the present in the United States. African American art in South and Central America, as well as from the Caribbean, will also be included in this overview to provide context. The African influence on the art and culture of the Americas will be explored. In addition, the course will analyze the impact of images produced by people of African descent and the photographic production of African American artists in historical and contemporary art and popular culture.
Prerequisites: ENG 102, ARH 211, ART 212 and ART 200 or permission of instructor, advisor and/or Chair.

ARH 495 Independent Study 1-4 credits
Faculty supervised research.

ART 100 Fundamentals of 2 D Design 3 credits
This course focuses on fundamental design concepts which are shared by all of the two dimensional visual arts. Design problems identify and explore the conceptual, visual, and relational elements of design. The visual elements point, line, shape, value, texture, and color along with their various attributes are examined. These will be combined together using the principles of organization to create a unified composition.
Prerequisites: None

ART 101 Fundamentals of 3 D Design 3 credits
This course focuses on fundamental design concepts which are shared by the three dimensional visual arts. Through studio problems, students will become familiar with three dimensional design concepts, construction processes, and the manipulation of materials to create structural forms. Students will develop an understanding of the qualities of line, shape, mass, volume, spatial relationships and surface as they apply to the three dimensional form.
Prerequisites: None

ART 102 Introduction to Computer Arts 3 credits
This introduces students to the basic concepts and techniques of graphic design and visual communications. It helps students understand how to design effective communication materials by learning the aesthetics of design and using the formal visual principles of design. The course will explore the basics of layout and typography and the processes of transmitting ideas and information into well-designed communication materials.
Prerequisites: None

ART 103 Introduction to Media & Color 3 credits
This course introduces students to the materials and techniques of two-dimensional art forms and provides them with a solid understanding of color theory and color mixing of pigment based media. Students will become familiar with the vocabulary of art making materials and techniques and will engage in hands-on exercises that will enhance the learning and understanding of these processes. This course provides foundation for courses in
Prerequisites: None

ART 200 Introduction to Art 3 credits
This course is designed to enhance the student's visual literacy and will provide a broad based introduction to the visual arts, including understanding and appreciating art in an historical, stylistic, and cultural context. Students will be introduced to works of art from a variety of cultures and time periods.
Prerequisites: ENG 101

ART 205 Drawing I 3 credits
This course will serve as an introduction to the fundamentals of drawing. This will include practice in a variety of drawing media; development of perceptual and manual skills; creating effective compositions; and understanding the use of line, shape, value, and space as elements of drawing.
Prerequisites: None

ART 210 Ceramics I 3 credits
This course focuses on ceramics as an art form and as a medium for utilitarian craft objects. The student will learn about the history of pottery from ancient times to its present day use by contemporary artists as an expressive medium. Course assignments are based on the vessel/container form.
Prerequisites: None

ART 215 Printmaking I 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to a variety of relief printing methods with emphasis on monoprinting, and linoleum and wood block printing. Both monochrome and color printing will be explored. Students will also learn to properly edition prints.
Prerequisites: ART100 and ART205

ART 220 Graphic Arts I 3 credits
This course develops a beginning level of proficiency with software programs designed to integrate digital type and digital and scanned images into various print and digital forms. It will develop the student’s ability to create effective design solutions and to communicate with image and type through an assortment of digital imaging problems. Students will develop an intermediate understanding of digital file formats (TIFF, PDF, JPEG, GIF etc.), color systems (RGB, CMYK) and typography concepts. There will be practical application (hands-on) assignments that will develop the students’ digital imaging, image creation and typography usage skills.
Prerequisites: ART102

ART 225 Painting I 3 credits
This course will introduce students to painting with acrylics. This will include experimentation with a variety of painting techniques and learning to prepare canvases for painting. Emphasis will be placed on color theory, value structure, and developing effective compositions. Subject matter will include still life, landscape and thematic studies.
Prerequisites: ART100, ART103 and ART205

ART 250 Sculpture I 3 credits
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and techniques of creating sculptural form. Construction methods covered involve both additive and subtractive processes, including carving, modeling, construction, and assemblage. Historical and contemporary examples of sculpture will be examined through lecture, research, and slide presentations.
Prerequisites: ART101

ART 305 Drawing II 3 credits
This course will continue the development of the student's perceptual and manual skills, and will introduce the use of color as a drawing element. Figure drawing will also be introduced with studies in anatomy, figure proportions, and portraiture. Drawing as a means of personal expression will be explored.
Prerequisites: ART100 and ART205

ART 310 Ceramics II 3 credits
Ceramics II introduces students to advanced clay-forming techniques that include hand building, throwing on the potter's wheel, and working with plaster molds. Surface treatments are explored, including both pre and post firing processes. Students are introduced to the electric firing process and will be expected to load and fire a kiln. Glaze and non-glaze processes are covered.
Prerequisites: ART210

ART 315 Printmaking II 3 credits
Students will be challenged technically and conceptually in continued exploration of linoleum and woodblock printing methods. Serigraph printing will be introduced. Students will be expected to complete two series of editioned prints. Nontraditional printing methods may also be explored.
Prerequisites: ART215

ART 320 Graphic Arts II 3 credits
This course introduces students to web based media and web page design. Students will create projects that relate to their own creative, aesthetic and conceptual interests which showcase skills in the layout of image and type.
Prerequisites: ART 102 and ART 220

ART 325 Painting II 3 credits
Students will be required to propose and complete a coherent series of paintings on the theme of their choice. Emphasis will be placed on concept and image development. Methods of presenting paintings will also be explored.
Prerequisites: ART 215

ART 350 Sculpture II 3 credits
Sculpture II provides an in depth investigation into working with clay, plaster, and wood as a sculptural medium using the forming processes of modeling, carving and casting. Students will create relief and in-the-round forms through the creation of models and molds. An emphasis will be placed on the expression of content through form.
Prerequisites: ART 250

ART 405 Drawing III 3 credits
Drawing III is an advanced level course that requires the student to produce a body of work using techniques and concepts learned in previous courses. While continuing to use drawing as a tool for image and idea development, emphasis will be placed on the development of the drawing as a completed artwork. Students will learn how to present their work professionally and provide written and visual documentation of their technical, conceptual and aesthetic investigations.
Prerequisites: ART 305

ART 410 Ceramics III 3 credits
Ceramics III is an advanced level course that requires the student to produce a body of work using techniques and processes learned in previous courses. Students will learn how to present their work professionally, and provide written and visual documentation of their technical research and aesthetic investigations.
Prerequisites: ART 310

ART 415 Printmaking III 3 credits
Printmaking III is an advanced level course that requires the student to produce a body of work using techniques and processes learned in previous courses. Students will learn how to present their work professionally, and provide written and visual documentation of their technical research and aesthetic investigations.
Prerequisites: ART 315

ART 420 Graphic Arts III 3 credits
Through a variety of print design projects, students will learn about issues and solutions concerning designing for print media including layout, text and image usage, and printing. Students will create projects for print media that relate to their own interests (creative, aesthetic and conceptual) as well as those that satisfy the needs of the client with commercial applications.
Prerequisites: ART 102 and ART 220
ART 425 Painting III 3 credits
Painting III is an advanced level course that requires the student to produce a body of work using techniques and processes learned in previous courses. Students will learn how to present their work professionally, and provide written and visual documentation of their technical research and aesthetic investigations.
Prerequisites: ART 325

ART 450 Sculpture III 3 credits
Sculpture III is an advanced level course that requires the student to produce a body of work using techniques and processes learned in previous courses. Students will learn how to present their work professionally, and provide written and visual documentation of their technical research and aesthetic investigations.
Prerequisites: ART 350

ART/MSM 490 Senior Seminar 3 credits
ART/MSM 490 is the “senior capstone” course for the Visual Arts major. Topics in this course will include contemporary issues and career opportunities in the arts, and information concerning graduate school choice and application. This course will assist the Visual Arts major to develop a professional portfolio of their creative works and/or academic research. Both Studio Arts and Museum Studies track students will make a formal presentation of their senior thesis topic to coincide with their senior thesis paper. Student’s portfolio will also include resume, artist’s statement or writing samples. Studio Arts track students will also create a holistic digital portfolio of their creative output. Exhibition methodology as well as pragmatic issues concerning an exhibition of art works will be covered.

ART 495 Independent Study 1-4 credits
Faculty supervised research.

MSM 210 Introduction to Museums & Collections 3 credits
This course provides an overview of the inner workings of museums and their contributions to the public by collecting, preserving, and interpreting material culture. Art museums are the focus of the course, but other institutions such as history, ethnographic, science and children’s museums, as well related sites such as zoos and public gardens, will be discussed. Topics covered include: the history of museums as a foundation for assessing current challenges in the field, organizational structures, development and marketing, museum education, the role of curators, management and care of collections, exhibition planning and the use of new technologies.
Prerequisites: ENG102

MSM 218 Barnes History 3 credits
Taught at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, this course surveys the aesthetic ideas of Dr. Albert Barnes (1872-1951) and provides insight into the history of the Barnes Foundation and its ongoing development, as well as issues related to museum education and organizational structure. Students explore visual aesthetics and communication through the elements and principles of design, analyze a variety of objects in the Barnes Foundation galleries (including African art and works by Renoir, Cézanne, Matisse, and Picasso) and explore society values in art and design to determine whether or not all works of art can be judged by a common standard of excellence.
Prerequisites: ART100 or ART200 or permission of instructor, advisor and Chair.

MSM 220 Collection Management and Care 3 credits
This course introduces students to management and care of museum collections. Students learn the responsibilities of the collections manager and registrar in the documentation of objects, forming collection management policies and establishing safe collection storage options and environmental monitoring. Other topics covered include: preservation and conservation, museum security, insurance, loan procedures, customs and related issues. The Lincoln University Collection of African Art and Material Culture is utilized to address object handling, writing condition reports, labeling, conducting inventories, and use of collections information management systems for cataloguing.
Prerequisites: MSM210
  
MSM 495 Independent Study 1-4 credits
Faculty supervised research.