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Student Learning Outcomes: Systems Dimension

GOAL:  MHS graduates will identify the principles of systems theories and other social science models and demonstrate ability to apply those principles to bring about meaningful systems change.

Objectives:

I. Students will be able to

  • Demonstrate an understanding of how a general knowledge of human service systems applies to a particular service.
  • Understand the self as a human system interfacing with other specific systems which furnished resources for self-help as a function of self-directed lifelong learning.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the systematic structure of the MHS program and incorporate it into the students learning plan using systems models.
  • Describe and analyze an array of complex organizational systems designed to develop the "professional self" of the student.
  • Define and illustrate the concept of social change and resource utilization as applied to social change.

II. Students will be able to

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of several social problems, which have precipitated the establishment of formal human service helping mechanisms.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the major socio-economic, political ideologies (conservative, liberal, moderate and radical) as well as the relevant sociological perspectives for interpreting and analyzing human behavior.
  • Apply knowledge of human systems to the "real world" of the human service work.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a variety of human service delivery systems: Helper, Client, Target, and Action systems.

III. Students will be able to

  • Demonstrate an understanding of general systems theory and illustrate its utility as a model for interpreting group behavior.
  • Discuss and clarify the merits of an interdisciplinary approach for working within groups and at the interface of groups and larger social systems.
  • Describe and explain the interplay of social forces and mechanisms that impinge upon and determine the evolution of groups in human service settings.
  • Distinguish differences in orientation, style, and patterns of behavior between a group that represents a relatively open system and one that represents a relatively closed system.
  • Cite specific behaviors within a group to illustrate the following concepts: internal-external system, subsystem, boundary, homeostasis entropy.
  • Indicate both the advantages and disadvantage of the intra-group and inter-group conflict.

IV. Students will be able to

  • Describe and explain the open systems framework and the necessity for building responsive and adaptive organizations.
  • Map out the agency’s tasked environment, identifying key elements for formulating effective strategic management initiatives.
  •  Demonstrate an understanding of the interagency collaboration, resource sharing, and conflict management.
  • Elucidate their master’s project and host organization in systems theory terms identifying specific open systems factors and trade-offs in consumer/customer decision-making including clients, policymakers, funders, and community power brokers.
  • Describe pertinent social, political, cultural, economic, and technological macro trends and indicate how each trend impinges upon the agency and a project.
  • Define each component of the marketing mix relating it to various exchange transactions used to promote agency viability and responsiveness.
  • Define strategic planning using examples to illustrate its application for agency & project.

V. Students will be able to

  • Examine and apply principles of conflict management, interest groups, and reference groups as applied to organizational and social change.
  • Identify environmental pressures threats and opportunities illustrating how they impact upon the student's agency.
  • Define and apply facilitative, re-educational, persuasive and power strategies to the process of organizational and social change.
  • Demonstrate how the Diffusion and Innovation concepts can be used to analyze change initiative.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of force field analysis as a tool for mapping out forces that impinge upon change initiatives, using graphic representations along with the appropriate narrative explanation and definitions.
  • Compare and contrast a variety of change models highlighting the advantages and the disadvantages of each

The Lincoln University
Center for Graduate and Continuing Education Programs
3020 Market St., Philadelphia PA 19104
(215) 387-2405