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Grad. Studies Home

Description of MHS Elective Courses

MICRO TRACK: Fall Semester

HUS 617: Theories and Processes of Aging (3 cr.)

This course will assist students in understanding the aged population through presentation of theories and research on the aged and the aging processes. Special attention will be given to African-American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American population and the rural elderly.

HUS 657: Family Counseling and Care Giving Challenges (3 cr.)

The first part of this course will give a cross-cultural & socio-historical review of families, while emphasizing the current status, including changes in marriage and family patterns. As well, paradigms for care giving across life stages will be explored. The second part will focus on interventions to promote family health and common approaches to family therapy. Timely topics such as marriage, family violence, AIDS, changing roles of women, impact on families of
substance abuse or mental illness will be addressed.

HUS 651: The Criminal Justice System (3 cr.)

This course is an application of organizational and administrative theories to the Criminal Justice system. The four major orientations of administration include managerial, political, psychological and sociological. The interlocking systems operating within the criminal and juvenile justice systems will be explored.

HUS 662: Therapeutic Counseling and Human Service Delivery: Application of Clinical Assessment and Testing (3 cr.)

This course will examine a variety of assessment and testing methods, advanced interviewing procedures, and observational techniques associated with the formulation of diagnostic impressions and treatment plans in human service settings. Emphasis will be given to multimodal and eclectic appraisals of cognitive, affective, social, vocational, interests/aptitude, achievement, intellectual and personality aspects of functioning. The course will also present frameworks and models for the development of assessment practices. Attention will be give to the function and origin of assessment and testing instruments and principles underlying counseling and clinical practice in various human services settings. Additionally, concepts identifying appropriate paradigms for diagnostic inferences will be covered. Guidelines for conducting the assessment process in an ethical and considerate manner will be presented. Much attention will be given to the implications of clinical assessment and testing for diagnosis, clinical decision making and treatment planning. The techniques, tools, instruments and models incorporated into the course content will be elucidated in a pragmatic manner to be utilized by counselors, clinicians and human service practitioners who might not necessarily administer psychological tests, but will, nevertheless, be responsible for making clinical judgments and interventions based upon an understanding of test results.

HUS 747: Sexuality Counseling and Consultation in human Services (3 cr.)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with sexual issues and challenges that he/she may encounter as a counselor or consultant. The student will learn about the myriad of ways in which sexuality is expressed and interpreted. The student will also assess and determine which aspects of sexuality are in line with his/her own personal value system. This course does not permit the student to practice “sex therapy” but provides a solid foundation that encompasses philosophical, psychological, sociological, and ecological theories. This introductory course will desensitize and provoke introspection for counter-transference.

HUS 647: Cross Cultural Perspectives to Aging (3 cr.)

This course will help students develop skills to assess and describe demographic characteristics of the aged with specific focus on African-American, Hispanic, Asian, and Native American elderly.

MACRO TRACK: Fall Semester

HUS 649: Tools and Models for Human Service Managers (3 cr.)

It is only through effective and efficient management practices that human service agencies can achieve a broad humanistic vision. This course will provide students with a variety of management tools models and perspectives essential for creating and maintaining efficient practices and effective strategies within human services organizations.

HUS 658: Social Welfare Problems and Policy (3 cr.)

This course provides foundation-level graduate human service students with an introduction to social welfare problems and policies. It is essential that human service workers at all practice levels understand the nature of social problems and the external influences that are fundamental to the creation and establishment of social welfare policies in the United States. Given human service’s emphasis on the person-in-the-environment, practitioners must understand the development of social policies through which various social systems and society as a whole attempt to manage, control, minimize, and eliminate social problems and their effects. Professional human service workers also have professional responsibilities for the development and implementation of welfare policies and programs that are created in response to social problems. Human service workers must be capable of analyzing and influencing the development of social welfare policy.

MSA 720: Human Resources Management (3 cr.)

The purpose of this course is to teach students the basic concepts of management. The emphasis will be on human resource management in the highly competitive global environment. We will address current issues in management and discuss case studies. The current legal and political environment will be the background for studying governmental influences on organizations.

COUNSELING TRACK: Fall Semester (required for all Counseling Track students)

HUS 692: Counseling Internship (3 cr.)

This course is designed to provide oversight and academic supervision for internship placement in a mental health/counseling agency setting. The student is expected to provide a variety of counseling services in a community human services agency under the site supervision of a licensed counselor or other qualified professional. Course work will focus on case supervision and discussion of counseling theories and skills to complement the internship experience.

HUS 662: Therapeutic Counseling and Human Service Delivery: Application of Clinical Assessment and Testing (3 cr.)

This course will examine a variety of assessment and testing methods, advanced interviewing procedures, and observational techniques associated with the formulation of diagnostic impressions and treatment plans in human service settings. Emphasis will be given to multimodal and eclectic appraisals of cognitive, affective, social, vocational, interests/aptitude, achievement, intellectual and personality aspects of functioning. The course will also present frameworks and models for the development of assessment practices. Attention will be give to the function and origin of assessment and testing instruments and principles underlying counseling and clinical practice in various human services settings. Additionally, concepts identifying appropriate paradigms for diagnostic inferences will be covered. Guidelines for conducting the assessment process in an ethical and considerate manner will be presented. Much attention will be given to the implications of clinical assessment and testing for diagnosis, clinical decision making and treatment planning. The techniques, tools, instruments and models incorporated into the course content will be elucidated in a pragmatic manner to be utilized by counselors, clinicians and human service practitioners who might not necessarily administer psychological tests, but will, nevertheless, be responsible for making clinical judgments and interventions based upon an understanding of test results.

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MICRO TRACK: Spring Semester

HUS 627: Methods of Working with the Elderly

This course will develop and define problem-solving skills which address unique needs and conditions of the aged. Attention will be given to the nature of practice in a variety of service delivery systems.

HUS 648: Theories and Treatment of Addiction

This course provides an understanding of the multiple factors that contribute to addictions and examines the cycles of addiction, personality and patterns of interaction. It includes the historic and generational influences on alcohol and drug abuse/dependence including adult children of alcoholics, enabling, and the family disease concept; the influences of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA), Narcotics Anonymous (NA), and 12 step philosophies in alcohol/drug treatment; and the uniqueness of treatment with special populations including sexual orientation, cultural dimensions, adolescents, women and the elderly. This course will examine contemporary drug issues relevant to the use and abuse of drugs. In addition, theoretical, and legal aspects of drug use will be presented. It will enable the students to become familiar with the general concepts and principles of drug and alcohol use, abuse and treatment modalities.

HUS 657: Family Counseling and Care Giving Challenges

The first part of this course will give a cross-cultural & socio-historical review of families, while emphasizing the current status, including changes in marriage and family patterns. As well, paradigms for care giving across life stages will be explored. The second part will focus on interventions to promote family health and common approaches to family therapy. Timely topics such as marriage, family violence, AIDS, changing roles of women, impact on families of substance abuse or mental illness will be addressed.

HUS 682: Counseling for Career Development

This course examines the role of the counselor in adult career development. The course is designed to teach theoretical frameworks and counseling skills for the career counseling process. The course includes an overview of theories of career development, as well as individual and programmed techniques for assessment, decision-making, and career search, advancement, and change. Students will apply course material to their own career development and to counseling specific clients in human service settings.

HUS 757: Counseling Adolescents for the Human Services Professional

An overview of the basic concepts of research and theory (both historical and current) in the field of adolescent psychology will be essential for individuals to grasp the developmental and sociological functioning of adolescents. This learning will utilize scholarly inquiry and will be self-directed in the form of an independent research project. The basic concepts of research and theory will be measured by the quizzes, papers, and examinations administered in class. As the basic concepts of adolescent psychology are attained, critical thinking/perspectives will be developed as individuals will be asked in large and small groups in class to compare and contrast research designs, cultural constructs, and social interventions. Critical thinking/perspectives will be assessed by the instructor during large and small group discussions and will be the responsibility of the individual to remain current in the readings. Developing a critical perspective is essential in that students will be better able to predict behavioral and affective outcomes and formulate hypotheses for future research/clinical endeavors related to adolescent psychology. Finally, through discussions, in-class writings, and class activities individuals will be able to assess to their own development and assumptions as it relates to social and cultural expectations about adolescents and research targeted at this population.

HUS 600: Gerontological Seminars

The purposes of these seminars are to guide students in the analysis of critical issues in aging. These issues will be presented from a social system orientation. Special emphasis will be placed on the implication of these issues for minority elderly.

MACRO TRACK: Spring Semester

HUS 659: Planning and Effecting Community Change

This course examines participatory planning as a systematic process for creating community change. It critically analyzes the sociopolitical context and core concepts of “planning for change,” major models and methods of practice, and practical tools for engaging community members, assessing community strengths and needs, setting goals and making action plans, building support and collaborative partnerships for implementation, and evaluation as a participatory community-based approach. Emphasis is placed on working with oppressed groups in racially segregated and economically disinvested areas.

HUS 123: Supervision

[TBA]

MSA 760: Employee and Labor Relations

This course examines employee relationships with management in both a union and non-union environment. It addresses issues such as policy formulation, complaint systems, employee rights, methodology of performance appraisals, employee morale and motivation and factors affecting employee health, safety, and security. It includes coverage of laws and regulations regarding labor-management relationships, administration of labor contracts, mediation and arbitration processes, collective bargaining, strategies of negotiation, unfair labor practices, and the management of organization-union relations.

COUNSELING TRACK: Spring Semester (required for all Counseling track students)

HUS 672: Principles of Psychopathology and Diagnosis

This course serves as an advanced practicum for students who have prior counseling experience and/or have completed a helping relationship practicum. This course provides a comprehensive review of current models and principles pertinent to the identification, description, and delineation of mental disorders. Concepts and terminology from the DSM-IV will be detailed and applied to an on-going clinical helping relationship. Special emphasis will be placed upon the reasoning, judgments, and extrapolations that underlie the process of clinical diagnosis and appropriate treatment planning.

HUS 682: Counseling for Career Development

This course examines the role of the counselor in adult career development. The course is designed to teach theoretical frameworks and counseling skills for the career counseling process. The course includes an overview of theories of career development, as well as individual and programmed techniques for assessment, decision-making, and career search, advancement, and change. Students will apply course material to their own career development and to counseling specific clients in human service settings.