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Editing for Consistency:
3 Tips to Make Sure That Your Words Go with the Flow

Tip #1:  Don't break the pattern that you set up in the beginning of a sentence. 

Awkward: In New York, I hope to see the World Trade Center site, take the ferry to Ellis Island, and I would like to catch a few Broadway plays too.

That sentence starts out by promising the reader that everything in the sentence will fit onto "I hope to," but then breaks that promise after two items by switching to "and I would like" for the third item in the series.

Better:   In New York, I hope to see the World Trade Center site, take the ferry to Ellis Island, and catch a few Broadway plays too.

Tip #2:  Be clear whether you are expressing a  group of  three or more (I need to study, work, and sleep more) or just a pair ( I need to work and sleep more.)

When there are THREE(or more) items, they are separated by commas, inserting an AND before the final item to signal the end of the series:  I need to study more, work harder, and sleep longer.

If  there are only TWO items, an AND (without comma) separates the two.  This AND is needed to separate two items even if one of the two items already contains an AND:  I need to study harder and work and sleep more.

The following sentence, for example, by using the X, Y & Z structure,  seems to promise the reader a series of three actions (practiced, worked, and ...???), but then breaks the promise by not adding a third action word.

Awkward:  I practiced my conference presentation, worked on some memos and client charts.

Better:  I practiced my conference presentation and worked on some memos and client charts.
--or--
I practiced my conference presentation, worked on some memos, and finished my
client charts.

Tip # 3:  Express parallel (related) ideas  in parallel form. Keep the rhythm that you set in the first part of the sentence going on through the end of the sentence.

Awkward:  Being a Lincoln graduate student is more fun than to be a movie star in Hollywood.

Better: Being a Lincoln graduate student  is more fun than being a Hollywood movie star.
--or
--
To be a  graduate student at Lincoln is more fun than to be a  movie star in Hollywood.