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Course Syllabi

Mathematics Syllabi | Computer Science Syllabi | Course Description Only

  . Math Developmental Courses

  . MAT-100 Level Courses
  . MAT-200 Level Courses
  . MAT-300 Level Courses
  . MAT-400 Level Courses

  . CSC-100 Level Courses
  . CSC-200 Level Courses
  . CSC-300 Level Courses
  . CSC-400 Level Courses











MATH Developmental Courses
MAT-098 Algebra I, 3 credits
Topics in this course include a review of the basic concepts of arithmetic and algebra with real numbers, solving first degree equations and inequalities of one variable, graphs and equations of lines in Cartesian co-ordinates, simplifying algebra expressions with exponent rules and properties, and operations on polynomials.
Prerequisite: By Placement

MAT-099 Algebra & Applications, 3 credits
This course consists of selected topics that include simplifying and operations on algebraic expressions and solving equations involving polynomials, rational expressions, and roots and radicals; and solving systems of linear equations and inequalities.
Prerequisite: MAT-098 or placement



MATH 100-Level Courses
MAT-106 Math for the Liberal Arts , 3 credits
Math for the Liberal Arts is an introduction to non-technical applications of mathematics in the modern world. The course is designed to cultivate an appreciation of the significance of mathematics in daily life and develop students' mathematical reasoning. Subjects include Quantitative Information in Everyday Life, Financial Management, Statistics, and Probability. OLD
Prerequisite: MAT-098 or By Placement                          

MAT-107 Quantitative Reasoning , 3 credits
This course is an introduction to non-technical applications of mathematics in the modern world. The course is designed to cultivate an appreciation of the significance of mathematics in daily life and develop students' mathematical reasoning. Subjects include Statistics, Probability, Exponential Growth, and Geometry.
Prerequisite: MAT-098 or By Placement                          

MAT-110 College Algebra, 3 credits
This course contains algebraic techniques, functions, and graphs which are essential in order to understand and use higher level mathematics. Topics include solving equations and inequalities, graphing equations and functions, identifying types of functions and characteristics of graphs, and solving application problems.
Prerequisite: MAT-099 or By Placement                          

MAT-111 Pre-Calculus, 3 credits
This course is an introduction to algebraic techniques, functions and graphs which are essential in order to understand and use higher level mathematics in courses beginning with calculus. Topics include exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions.
Prerequisite: MAT-110 or placement

MAT-114 Elementary Statistics I, 3 credits
This course is designed for students who need an elementary knowledge of statistics. The basic ideas of descriptive statistical methods are considered, including frequency distribution, measures of location and variation. It also includes permutation, combination and rules of probability, together with well-known probability distributions such as binomial, poisson, geometric, hyper geometric and multinomial.
Prerequisite: MAT-110

MAT-115 Elementary Statistics II, 3 credits
This course is a continuation of MAT 114. Among the topics covered are estimation, hypothesis testing, design of experiments, chi-square, analysis of variance, regression analysis, covariance analysis, and nonparametric approaches. Emphasis will be placed on interpretation and use of the computer software packages.
Prerequisite: MAT-114

MAT-117 Finite Mathematics, 3 credits
This course is designed for students in the Social Sciences, The goal of the course is to give the student a working knowledge of the areas of mathematics that are most applicable to his or her particular discipline. Among the topics studied will be elementary matrix algebra, linear programming, logarithms, progressions, and the mathematics of finance.
Prerequisite: MAT-110         

MAT-120 Calculus for Life Science and Social Science Majors, 4 credits
This course studies differential and integral calculus with a focus on its applications to business and economics. Topics to be covered are increments and rates, limits, the derivative, rules of differentiation, logarithmic differentiation, methods of integration, and applications of the definite integral to business and economics.
Prerequisite: MAT-117

MAT-121 Calculus I, 4 credits
This is the first course in the calculus sequence designed for students intending to major in mathematics, the natural sciences, and engineering. The topics covered will include: limits and continuity; derivatives rules of algebraic, trigonometric and inverse trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions; extreme values and graphing of functions; and applications to optimization, related rate, and initial value problems.
Prerequisite: MAT-111

MAT-122 Calculus II, 4 credits
This is the second semester course in the Calculus sequence designed for students intending to major in mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering. The topics covered will include: integration, geometrical applications, integration techniques, and infinite series.
Prerequisite: MAT-121

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MATH 200-Level Courses
MAT-210 Foundations and History of Mathematics , 3 credits
This course develops the fundamental concepts of Euclidean Geometry from an axiomatic point of view. Topics include points, lines and angles; polygons, circles, and polyhedron; congruence, similarity, and incidence; parallelism and perpendicularity; and transformations, volumes and areas. Non-Euclidean geometries are introduced.
Prerequisite: MAT-120 or MAT-221                                                 

MAT-211 College Geometry, 3 credits
This course develops the fundamental concepts of Euclidean Geometry from an axiomatic point of view. Topics include points, lines and angles; polygons, circles, and polyhedron; congruence, similarity, and incidence; parallelism and perpendicularity; and transformations, volumes and areas. Non-Euclidean geometries are introduced.
Prerequisite: MAT-121 and MAT-213                                                 

MAT-212 Mathematical Modeling, 3 credits
This course is an introduction to the development and study of mathematical models. It is designed in such a way that students from other disciplines will find it useful as a summary of modern mathematical methods, and mathematics majors will benefit from applications of mathematics to real life problems. Undergraduate students from the Natural and Social Sciences will find most of the material accessible because the prerequisite is basic calculus.
Prerequisite: MAT-120 or MAT-121

MAT-213 Discrete Mathematics, 3 credits
This course is designed as an elementary introduction to topics in discrete mathematics including sets, logic, Boolean algebra, methods of proof, graphs, and trees.
Prerequisite: MAT-111 or MAT-117

MAT-214 Linear Algebra, 3 credits
This course is designed as an introduction to algebraic linear systems, including the following topics: vector spaces, subspaces, bases, dimension, linear dependence and independence, linear transformations, matrices, matrix operations, rank equivalence relations, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors.
Prerequisite: MAT-122

MAT-221 Calculus III, 4 credits
This is the third course in the Calculus sequence designed for students intending to major in mathematics, natural sciences, and engineering. The topics covered will include: power series, parametric equations, polar co-ordinates, vector calculus, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and applications.
Prerequisite: MAT-122

MAT-222 Differential Equations, 3 credits
Topics include solution methods and applications of first order differential equations, solution of higher order differential equations using the characteristic equation, the undetermined coefficients and variation of parameters methods, existence and uniqueness theorems for initial value problems, and Laplace transforms.
Prerequisite: MAT-122

MAT-240 Combinatorics, 3 credits
Combinatorics is frequently described as the mathematics of "counting without counting." It has a wide variety of applications in computer science, communications, transportation, genetics, experimental design, scheduling, and so on. This course is designed to introduce the student to the tools of Combinatorics from an applied point of view.
Prerequisite: MAT-099 or MAT-110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


MATH 300-Level Courses
MAT-310 Methods of Teaching Mathematics, 3 credits
This course is a study of strategies, techniques, materials, technology, and current research used in the teaching of mathematical concepts to high school students. Students will review the traditional and contemporary standards involved in teaching mathematics at the secondary school level; develop an awareness of the professional resources, materials, technology and information available for teachers; prepare unit and lesson plans with related assessment procedures on a variety of topics; and acquire teaching experience by taking part in individual tutoring, observation at a high school, and/or presenting lessons at the appropriate level.
Prerequisite: Junior Education Major Co-requisite: MAT-211

MAT-313 Numerical Methods, 3 credits
Modern computational algorithms for the numerical solution of a variety of applied mathematics problems are considered. Topics include numerical solution of polynomial and transcendental equations, acceleration of convergence, Lagrangian interpolation and least-squares approximation, numerical differentiation and integration.
Prerequisite: MAT-122 and CSC-158

MAT-325 Modern Algebra I
This course covers the following topics: set theory, functions and mappings, permutations, theory of groups, rings and ideals, homomorphisms, integral domains and fields.
Prerequisite: MAT-213 and MAT-214                              

MAT-341 Mathematical Statistics I, 3 credits
This is a first course in a year-long sequence designed for Mathematics majors. The topics include the algebra of sets, probability in finite sample spaces, random variables and probability functions, including the mean, variance, and joint probability functions, the binomial distribution, and applications.
Corequisite: MAT-221

MAT-342 Mathematical Statistics II, 3 credits
This is the second course in a year-long sequence designed for Mathematics majors. The topics include distribution of random variables, conditional probability and stochastic independence, special distributions including the (t) and (F) distributions, moment generating techniques, limiting distributions, and the central limit theorem.
Prerequisite: MAT-341


MATH 400-Level Courses
MAT-400 & 401 Topics in Mathematics I & II, 3 credits each
These courses cover various topics chosen by the faculty as being of interest to current students in the Mathematics program. .
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor

MAT-421 Analysis I, 3 credits
This course is designed as an introduction to the rigorous development of the fundamentals of analysis. The following topics will be covered in this course: analytic and algebraic structure of the set of real numbers, sequences and series of real numbers, limits and continuity of functions.
Prerequisite: MAT-213 and MAT-221

MAT-422 Analysis II, 3 credits
This is the second semester course in a one-year sequence that is designed as a rigorous development of fundamentals of analysis for Mathematics majors. The following topics will be covered in this course: differentiation of functions, integration of functions, infinite series, and sequences and series of functions.
Prerequisite: MAT-421

MAT-423 Introductory Complex Variables I, 3 credits
Topics include complex numbers, analytic functions, contour integration, residues, and power series.
Prerequisite: MAT-221

MAT-475 Seminar I, 3 credits each
This course will focus on involving students in independent projects dealing with current topics or research interests in higher Mathematics. Students will be required to conduct a literature survey, carry out independent investigations projects, prepare a report, and defend their work in an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Math Major

MAT-495 Independent Research 1-4 credits (Click for the Registrar form)
Independent research or study projects supervised by a member of the faculty.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

MAT-498 Internship 1-4 credits
Please use the above link to see the internship form.

 

 

 

 

 


CSC 100-Level Courses
CSC-151 Computer Applications, 3 credits
This course is designed to give the students an introduction to applications of computers in the area of spreadsheets, database management, presentation, structured programming, and web programming. Desktop software such as Microsoft office as well as a programming language compiler will be utilized in this course.
Prerequisite: MAT-098 or placement

CSC-152 Introduction to Programming, 3 credits
This introductory programming course is designed for non-computer science majors. This course introduces the student to principles of computer programming via a visual programming language. The students will learn to create graphical user interface forms and apply visual programming to problem solving. Topics will include basic control statements. Event-driven programming will be an integral part of the course.
Prerequisite: MAT-098 or placement

CSC-158 Computer Programming I, 3 credits
This course is the first course in a year- long sequence required for Computer Science majors. It introduces the student to principles of computer programming via a structured programming language. The students will write, test, and debug a wide variety of problems drawn from several disciplines. The course will also address program design and program style.
Prerequisite: MAT-110

CSC-159 Computer Programming II, 3 credits
This course is a continuation of CSC-158. The students will use a structured programming language in problem solving. This course examines advanced features of programming languages. Topics include file processing, and object oriented and event-driven programming. As a preparation for CSC-254, this course will also include an introduction to data structures such as queues and stacks.
Prerequisite: CSC-158


CSC 200-Level Courses
CSC-201 Web Programming, 3 credits
This course is an introduction to web design with an emphasis on the scripting languages. Both server-side and client-side scripting will be studied. HTML programming is an integral part of the course. Topics include database processing for the web using SQL language and Internet security.
Prerequisite: CSC-158

CSC-202 Introduction to Computer Animation, 3 credits
This is course is a study of the art and science of computer animation. Both programming and utilization of animation software will be covered with an emphasis on the latter. The topics include NURBS and Polygon modeling, rendering techniques, motion path, and introductory applications of mathematics and algorithms in computer gaming.
Prerequisite: CSC-159

CSC-254 Data Structures, 3 credits
This course will focus on algorithms, analysis, and the use of basic and advanced data structures. Among the specific data structures covered are strings, stacks, records, linked lists, trees and graphs. Recursion will also be covered. Sequential and random files, hashing and indexed sequential access methods for files will be discussed. Finally, some standard computer science algorithms (sorting and searching) will be discussed.
Prerequisite: CSC-159

CSC-290 Special Topics, 3 credits
Computer Scince department may occasionally offer special courses of interest such as COBOL. This course can count as a general elective course toward 120 crredits, but it may not count toward the CSC major curriculum requirements.

CSC-299 Internship, 1-3 credits
Please use the above link to see the internship form.

CSC 300-Level Courses
CSC-353 Computer Organization and Assembly Language, 3 credits
This course is intended as a first introduction to the ideas of computer architecture-both hardware and software. Assembly language programming is the central theme of the course. The attributes and operations of a macro assembler are discussed in some detail.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-354 Database Management, 3 credits
This course will introduce students to the principles of single and multiple applications of database systems. In addition, it will develop graphical and logical skills that are used to construct logical models of information handling systems. Topics include normalization and removal of data redundancies, insertion, deletion, and update anomalies; logical and physical views of data, the entity-relationship model, data description and data manipulation languages, relational, hierarchal, and network approaches, as well as data security and integrity and database processing for the web.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-355 Operating Systems, 3 credits
An operating system is a program that acts as the link between the computer and its users. A well written operating system makes it easy and fun to use a computer. This course will introduce the student to the principles and concepts of operating systems design, discuss major issues of importance in the design, and show how different widely used operating systems have implemented the design ideas. In short, this course will teach what operating systems does, how it may do it, and why there are different approaches.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-356 Visual Programming, 3 credits
This course is a study of graphical-user-interface (GUI) and component-based programming. The course covers visual programming skills needed for modern software development. Topics will include event handling and event procedures, problem solving, business applications, game applications, database interface, and software design.
Prerequisite: CSC-159

CSC-357 Computer Architecture, 3 credits
This course is intended to explore the interface between a computer's hardware and its software. The interface is often called computer architecture. Starting from the basic ideas of assembly language programming, this course will give the students an idea of where the software stops and the hardware begins, and what things can be done efficiently in hardware and how.
Prerequisite: CSC-353

CSC-358 Artificial Intelligence, 3 credits
This course is intended to explore the ideas and developments in Artificial Intelligence. Artificial intelligence algorithms in pattern recognition, game playing, image analysis, and problem solving will be covered. Also included among the topics are rule-based expert systems, fuzzy logic, neural networks, and learning systems.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-359 Introduction To Computer Security, 3 credits
Computer security, both in the abstract and in the context of real systems, including recognizing potential threats to confidentiality, integrity and availability, and developing familiarity with current security-related issues in computer science. Threats and vulnerabilities are assessed to determine the level of risk.
Prerequisite: CSC-355 (Operating Systems)

CSC-360 Information Assurance and Security, 3 credits
This course will study how to establish and maintain a practical cyber and information security program to protect key organizational assets. The aim is to develop an information security program that is aligned with organizational strategy and to evaluate and recommend information and security technologies to support the information security program. Discussion covers the integration of confidentiality, integrity, and availability into an organization's security program through the use of physical and logical security controls. Topics include data protection, telecommunications systems, applications, and emerging technologies.
Prerequisite: CSC-359 Introduction To Computer Security)
Prerequisite or Co-rerequisite: CSC-354 Database Management)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


CSC 400-Level Courses
CSC-451 Computer Simulations 3 credits
This course demonstrates to the student how computers may be used to represent selected characteristics of real world systems by utilizing mathematical models. The simulation projects will be done using a simulation software package and a structured programming language. Statistical analyses are carried out.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-452 Computer Graphics 3 credits
This course develops and applies the mathematical theory of computer graphics. The theory includes rotation, translation, perspective projection, and curve and surface description. The course will use a structured programming language. In addition, it will use available commercial graphic packages.
Prerequisite: CSC-254 and MAT-122 and MAT-213

CSC-453 Compiler Construction 3 credits
This course is intended to explore the principal ideas and techniques of compiler construction. Topics include lexical analyzers, parsers, error detection, code generation, symbol tables, and formal languages.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-454 Software Engineering 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the principles and techniques involved in the generation of production quality software items. The emphasis will be on the specification, organization, implementation, testing and documentation of software products.
Prerequisite: CSC-254

CSC-455 Mathematical and Statistical Software 3 credits
This course will introduce the student to the currently available mathematical and statistical software on personal computers in particular, and mainframes in general. Hands-on activities with software items will form a major part of the course. The student will be trained not only to use the software items, but also interpret the results meaningfully as related to specific applications situations. The course is designed primarily for students interested in scientific and statistical computing and analysis. Report writing will be required on all projects.
Prerequisite: CSC-159 and MAT-117

CSC-456 Operations Research 3 credits
Operations Research is a very important area of study which tracks its roots to business applications. It combines the three broad disciplines of Mathematics, Computer Science, and Business Applications. This course will formally develop the ideas of developing, analyzing, and validating mathematical models for decision problems, and their systematic solution. The course will involve programming and mathematical analysis.
Prerequisite: CSC-151 and MAT-117

CSC-457 Computer Networks 3 credits
This course is an introduction to local area and long haul computer communication networks, analysis, design and implementation of network protocols.
Prerequisite: CSC-159

CSC-458 Introduction To Game Programming 3 credits
An introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer game programming. Students design and develop original games for PCs applying proven game design and software engineering principles.
Prerequisite: CSC-202
Co-Requisite: CSC-454

CSC-460 Network Security and Privacy 3 credits
This course will study of the fundamental concepts of network security and its implementation. The aim is to assess and mitigate risk, evaluate and select appropriate technologies, and apply proper security safeguards.
Prerequisite: CSC-457 (Computer Network)

CSC-490 2D Games Development Capstone 3 credits
The Capstone Game Development course forms small teams in which student will contribute modeling, animation or programming skills to create 2D games for mobile, online, and social technology platforms. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 2D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios.
Prerequisite: CSC458 (Introduction to Game Programming)ne)

CSC-491 3D Games Development Capstone 3 credits
The Capstone Game Development course forms small teams in which student will contribute modeling, animation or programming skills to create 3D games. Students will gain a thorough understanding of the 3D game development process, through modeling of the environment and practices that are used in game studios.
Prerequisite: CSC 490 (2D Games Development Capstone)


CSC-495 Independent Research 1-3 credits (Click for the Registrar form)
Independent research or study projects supervised by a member of the faculty.
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department

CSC-498 & 499 Topics in Computer Science I & II, 3 credits each
This course will focus on involving students in independent projects dealing with current topics of current research interest in Computer Science. Students will be required to conduct a literature survey, carry out independent investigations projects, prepare a report, and defend their work in an oral presentation.
Prerequisite: Senior Status in Computer Science

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please consult with the department chairperson for any program updates or corrections which may not be yet reflected on this site. Also, please forward suggestions about this page to abarimani@lu.lincoln.edu.

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