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Department of History, Political Science & Philosophy
College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

 

PROGRAMS
History
Philosophy
Political Science
Religion

Black Studies Minor
Pre-Law Certificate

Philosophy Program Requirements & Course Descriptions

PHILOSOPHY MAJOR

Required Courses (3 credits each):
PHL 215 – Ethics
PHL 217 – Critical Reasoning
PHL 218 – Formal Logic
PHL 301 – Metaphysics
PHL 401 – Epistemology
PHL 411 – Philosophy Seminar

Select Two (3 credits each):
PHL 219 – World Philosophy I
PHL 201 – Greek Philosophy
PHL 202 – Modern Philosophy
PHL 312 – Twentieth Century Philosophy

Select Any Three Electives (3 credits each):
PHL 111 – Everyday Ethics
PHL 200 – Introduction to Philosophy
PHL 207 – Biomedical Ethics
PHL 208 – Business Ethics
PHL 211 – African American Philosophy
PHL 212 – African Philosophy
PHL 214 – Topics in Philosophy
PHL 216 – Contemporary Moral Problems
PHL 302 – God and Philosophy
PHL 303 – Legal Philosophy
PHL 304 – Environmental Philosophy
PHL 305 – Existentialism
PHL 306 – Aesthetics
PHL 307 – Political Philosophy
PHL 402 – Philosophy of Science
COM 404 – Media Law and Ethics
PHL 495 – Independent Study
Total 33 Credits

PHILOSOPHY MINOR

Select Two (3 credits each):
PHL 215 – Ethics
PHL 217 – Critical Reasoning
PHL 218 – Formal Logic
PHL 301 – Metaphysics
PHL 401 – Epistemology
PHL 411 – Philosophy Seminar
PHL 412 – Philosophy Seminar
Select Four Philosophy Electives
Total 18 Credits

ETHICS MINOR

Required Courses (3 credits each):
PHL 215 – Ethics
PHL 217 – Critical Reasoning

Select Four Electives:
PHL 207, 208,214,216,303,304,305, COM 404, or REL 202

Total 18 Credits

Pre-Law Certificate Program

PHL 217 - Critical Reasoning
POL 310 - Race and American Law
ENG 314 - Legal Analysis and Writing
Select one of the following:
POL 400 - Legal Problem Solving and Skills Development
POL 204 – Legal Systems
SOC 101 – Law and Society
POL 401 – Supreme Court and Constitutional Law
PHL 303 – Legal Philosophy
ECO 334 – Business Law
COM 404 – Media Law and Ethics
Total 12 credits

Philosophy Courses (3 credits each):

PHL 111 Everyday Ethics
This course examines the ethical issues which arise in everyday life, especially issues concerning interpersonal communication. The course facilitates the development of critical thinking skills in approaching these issues.

PHL 200 Introduction to Philosophy
This course provides an introduction to philosophy through examination of philosophical problems in the classic divisions of ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology. Students are encouraged to learn to “do” philosophy. Prerequisite ENG 101

PHL 201 Greek Philosophy
This course covers Greek philosophy from its origin up to and through the medieval period. This includes examining the works of the Pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Epictetus, St. Augustine, and St. Thomas Aquinas.

PHL 202 Modern Philosophy
This course covers philosophy in the modern period. It includes examination of rationalists such as Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, and empiricists such as Locke, Berkeley, and Hume. It examines Kant’s response to the development of modern philosophy.

PHL 207 Biomedical Ethics
This course examines ethical theories and concepts as they apply to biomedicine, including the role of medical doctor and nurse, confidentiality, informed consent, patient’s rights, medical experimentation on human subjects, involuntary civil commitment, abortion, sterilization of the mentally challenged, genetic engineering, and justice and health care.

PHL 208 Business Ethics
This course examines ethical theories and concepts as they apply to the social responsibility of corporations, regulations, risk to consumers, workers, and the environment, advertising and deception, employee rights and obligations, affirmative action, sexual harassment, whistle blowing, and international business.

PHL 211 African American Philosophy
This course examines a select set of issues in the philosophical thinking of African American philosophers such as race and racism, separation and assimilation, violence and liberation, social justice, and gender.

PHL 212 African Philosophy
This course examines a selected set of historical developments and issues in the philosophical thinking of Africans and about Africa.

PHL 214 Topics in Philosophy
This course examines selected philosophical issues and historical periods not covered in other courses in the Philosophy Program. Topics vary.

PHL 215 Ethics
This course examines central issues in moral philosophy from both a historical and contemporary point of view. Topics include virtue and the good life, moral reasoning, relativism, egoism, utilitarianism, deontology, rights theory, and justice.

PHL 216 Contemporary Moral Problems
This course examines a selection of contemporary moral issues in the following areas: abortion, euthanasia, suicide, sexual relations and gay marriage, terrorism, affirmative action, genetic engineering, treatment of animals, the environment, and capital punishment.

PHL 217 Critical Reasoning
This course emphasizes the development of thinking skills, especially with regard to skills dealing with problems in everyday life. It includes meaning and definition of terms, identification and reconstruction of arguments, evaluation of arguments, identification of fallacies, and writing argumentative papers.

PHL 218 Formal Logic
This course is an introduction to the principles of formal logic, including deductive validity, truth functional connectives, translation, truth tables, elementary inferences, predication logic, and traditional syllogistic logic.

PHL 219 World Philosophy I
This course provides a broad overview of the historical development of philosophy from the roots of philosophy in oral traditions to the Enlightenment. It includes traditional Western traditions as well as philosophy from India, China, the Near and Middle East, and Africa.

PHL 220 World Philosophy II
This course provides a broad overview of the historical development of philosophical thought from Kant and the nineteenth century through the twentieth century Western philosophy. It includes recent philosophies in India, China, Japan, the Islamic World, and Africa.

PHL 301 Metaphysics
This course examines the nature of metaphysics through the examination of the role of metaphysical assumptions in moral, legal, social, political, religious, and scientific practices. Issues include the existence of God, the reality of value, the nature and persistence of the mind, the nature and identity of persons, the existence of the state and other collective entities, and causation and responsibility.

PHL 302 God and Philosophy
This course examines issues such as the existence of God, divine attributes, religious experience, faith and reason, the problem of evil, miracles and revelation, death and immortality, religious pluralism, and ethics in religion.

PHL 303 Legal Philosophy
This course examines classical and contemporary views on the nature of law and legal reasoning. It examines issues such as equality and liberty in constitutional law, punishment and capital punishment, excuses, the nature of crime, and causation and liability in tort law.

PHL 304 Environmental Philosophy
This course examines classical and contemporary views of the images of nature and worldviews concerning the treatment of the environment and animals. It considers ethical issues such as wilderness preservation, animals rights, population and consumption, biodiversity, sustainable development and justice, and technology and the environment.

PHL 305 Existentialism
This course begins with an examination of classical writings of existential philosophy. Following this, it moves to consider recent adaptions of existential thinking among Black philosophers and concludes with consideration of a viable form of existentialism.

PHL 306 Aesthetics
This course examines selected topics in the nature of art and beauty. It includes discussion of formalism, expressionism, Marxism, criteria of art criticism, aesthetic perception, and theories of art. It addresses the question of “What is a work of art?”

PHL 307 Political Philosophy
This course is an examination of such questions as the nature and justification of the state, representation and democracy, justice, equality, rights, liberty and oppression.

PHL 312 Twentieth Century Philosophy
This course covers the history of philosophy from Kant through the twentieth century. It examines philosophical movements such as analytical philosophy, logical positivism, phenomenology and existentialism. Included is the study of analytical tradition of Russell, Moore, Ryle, Wittgenstein, and Austin; also, includes is the continental tradition of Husserl, Sartre, and Heidegger.

PHL 401 Epistemology
This course is an examination of issues such as skepticism, induction, the gettier problem, justification, foundationalism, theories of truth, internalism and externalism, a priori knowledge, and perception.

PHL 402 Philosophy of Science
This course is an examination of key issues in scientific knowledge such as the nature of scientific explanation, the validation of scientific theories, the historical development and role of revolution in science, and realism and anti-realism in science.

PHL 411 Philosophy Seminar
This course examines a major philosophical problem or a major philosophical thinker. Each student writes an extended research paper on the selected problem or writer.
Prerequisite: PHL 401, PHL 301, or PHL 218.

PHL 412 Philosophy Seminar
This course examines a major philosophical problem or a major philosophical thinker. Each student writes an extended research paper on the selected problem or writer.
Prerequisite: PHL 401, PHL 301, or PHL 218.

PHL 495 Independent Study (1-4 credits)
Students may petition the Department to do an independent study on a special topic of interest.

 

 

 

 

 

Philosophy Home

Philosophy Program Requirements & Courses

Philosophy Faculty

Faculty Profiles

Dr. Dana Flint

Dr. Safro Kwame

Mr. Michael Gentzel

 

College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

 

 

 

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484-365-8000

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