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Department of History, Political Science & Philosophy
College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

 

PROGRAMS
History
Philosophy
Political Science
Religion

Black Studies Minor
Pre-Law Certificate

History Program Requirements & Course Descriptions

HISTORY MAJOR

To qualify as a History Major for the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree, a student must complete at least twelve history courses approved by the History Department. These courses will ordinarily be taken at Lincoln and must include three courses (nine hours) in Western or European History; three courses (nine hours) in United States History; three courses (nine hours) in African-American History; three courses (nine hours) in African History in addition to two semesters of Historical Methods (History 401-402). A student who wishes to receive a Bachelor of Arts in History must complete four semesters of the same foreign language through the intermediate level (202). A student who wishes to receive a Bachelor of Science degree in History need not take a foreign language.

Select three (3): 3 Credits each
HIS 101 - Modern European History I
HIS 102 - Modern European History II
HIS 103 – Contemporary World History
HIS 207-208 History of England
HIS 215 - Historical Geography
HIS 301-302 – Medieval History
HIS 305 – Russian Intellectual History
HIS 315-316 – The Third Republic in France

Select three (3): 3 Credits each
HIS 105 - History of United States I
HIS 106 - History of United States II
HIS 110 – Recent United States History
HIS 309 – United States Intellectual History
HIS 312 Urban History of the United States
HIS 313 United States Diplomatic History I
HIS 314 United States Diplomatic History II

Select three (3): 3 Credits each
HIS 205 - History of African-AmericanPeople I
HIS 206 - History of African-AmericanPeople II
HIS 212 – History of Black People in the 20thCentury

Select three (3): 3 Credits each
HIS 211 - History of Revolutionary Africa
HIS 307 - History of Africa I
HIS 308 - History of Africa II

Required: 3 Credits each
HIS 401 - Historical Methods I
HIS 402 - Historical Methods II

Total 42 credits

Electives (Offered at the discretion of the Department) 3 Credits Each:
HIS 107-108 – History of East Asia
HIS 204 – Latin American History
HIS 303-304 – Seminar in History

Secondary Education Social Studies/History Program

Students may work towards Social Studies certification through the following two programs, which are housed in the History Department. Both programs have a specific purpose. The History Social Studies Secondary Education is a Dual Major in History and Education with required courses in the other Social Science Departments. While this program provides the student with the necessary courses for Secondary Social Studies Teaching Certification for Grade 7- 12, it also provides a strong History background for those interested in Graduate or Law School.

The Social Studies Certification Program provides the basic courses that will give students the opportunity to meet the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) standards or competencies required for one to teach Social Studies at the Secondary level for Grades 7 – 12. Students will need to take courses in History, Political Science, Sociology, Economics, Psychology, and Education.

Select one (1): 3 Credits each
HIS 101 - Modern European History I
HIS 102 - Modern European History II
HIS 103 - Contemporary World History
HIS 105 - History of United States I
HIS 106 - History of United States II
HIS 205 - History of African-American People I
HIS 206 - History of African-American People II
HIS 215 - Historical Geography
HIS 307 - History of Africa I
HIS 308 - History of Africa II
HIS 401 - Historical Methods I
HIS 402 - Historical Methods II

Other required courses:
POL 101 - American National Government
ECO 201 - Principles of Macroeconomics
SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201- General Anthropology
PSY 101 - General Psychology

Total 45 credits

Students must complete the above History major requirements and the Secondary Education requirements listed in the Department of Education.

Social Studies Education Program

Select one (1): 3 Credits each
HIS 101 - Modern European History I
HIS 103 - Contemporary World History
HIS 105 - History of United States I
HIS 205 - History of African-American People I
HIS 215 - Historical Geography
HIS 401 - Historical Methods I
HIS 402 - Historical Methods II

Other required courses: 3 Credits each
POL 101 - American National Government
ECO 201 - Principles of Macroeconomics
SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology
SOC 201- General Anthropology
PSY 101 - General Psychology
Total 33 credits

In addition to the above courses, the student must take the required courses for Secondary Education as defined in the section of this catalog for the Department of Education.

HISTORY MINOR

To qualify as a History Minor, a student must complete at least five courses in History, which shall be distributed over the fields of United States History; Western or European History; African-American and African History. At least two of these courses must be above the 300 level

HISTORY COURSES (3 credits each):

101-102 Modern European History
This is a basic introduction to the study of history. The first semester covers the development of Europe from the close of the Middle Ages to the revolutions of 1848. The second semester covers the period from 1848 to 1939. Writings of contemporary authors and historians with varying points of view supplement the use of a basic text.

103-104 Contemporary World History
This course is intended to introduce students to different issues in contemporary societies. As a backdrop to the course, students will be exposed to different ideas that shaped historical developments in the modern world. Ideas of 19th and 20th century thinkers and philosophers would be discussed. The two world wars and the by-products of World War II in particular shall be given in depth discussions. The course shall end with analyses of global conflicts in the modern period.

105-106 History of the United States
The first semester covers the period from the first explorations to 1876, with emphasis on the following topics: the expansion of Europe in the 16th century, life in the colonies, the growth of American political institutions, and the sectional conflict. The second semester covers the period from 1877 to the present, with particular emphasis upon political and social developments.

107-108 History of East Asia
This course is an elementary survey of the historical development of the major East Asian countries from circa 600 B. C. to modern times. The first semester deals primarily with the formation of the traditional culture and government of East Asia. The second semester concerns the impact of the West on East Asia, starting with the Opium War and ending with the Communist Revolution in China. Special emphasis will be on a comparison of the response of China and Japan to Western ideas and technology.

110 History of the United States Since 1945
This course covers intensively the period of United States history since World War II. It reviews domestic politics and foreign affairs, with some emphasis upon current events.

204 Latin American History
The course traces the economic and political history of the South and Central American nations since 1800. Emphasis is placed on the relation of Latin America to the interests and policies of the United States.

205. History of the African-American People, Part I
The first semester of this course covers the period from the African background to the outbreak of the Civil War. It includes early history and the ear of slavery and traces the important movements, including protest movements, to the outbreak of the Civil War.

206 History of the African-American People, Part II
The second semester of this course commences
with the end of slavery, then treats Reconstruction, the betrayal of radical Reconstruction and the basic problems which have emerged both in the South and North, with emphasis on the protest movements emerging in the twentieth century until World War I.

207-208 History of England
This course traces the growth of English life from Anglo-Saxon times to the present, dealing with the major political, constitutional and economic developments of the country. It is designed to meet the needs of pre-law students and English literature majors as well as the interests of history majors.

211 History of Revolutionary Africa in the 20th
This course examines the history of the African revolutionary movements. The study includes revolutionary forces in the following countries: Algeria, the Mau Mau in Kenya; the Portuguese colonies, i.e., Guinea Bissau, Angola and Mozambique, and the struggle for Southern Africa. All the factors that have initiated revolution in these areas such as land and taxes will be analyzed.

212 History of Black People in the 20th Century
This course deals with the most recent phase of the history of Black Americans. Up to World War I, the period covered in History 205-206, while attention is paid to the North, major emphasis is on the South. But with the great migration of World War I to the North and the rise of the Northern Black ghettoes, the emphasis turns increasingly to the North while the South is by no means neglected. Events of World War II and the postwar era are included.

215 Historical Geography
This course will focus on historical geographical concepts and will introduce the student to topographic maps, the Grid System, terrain, patterns, and map readings. It will show how geography has shaped and influenced historical evolution. There is no prerequisite.

301-302 Medieval History
The first semester deals with the decline of Rome and the evolution of medieval society, emphasizing the basic characteristics of feudalism and the cultural life of Europe to 1200 A.D. The second semester covers the transition from medieval to modern society with treatment of non-European as well as European influences.

303-304 Seminar in History
A select number of students will pursue particular topics under the direction of the instructor. Emphasis will be placed upon the use of primary sources, and students will be expected to present oral and written reports from a variety of historical fields.

305 Russian Intellectual History
Nineteenth-century Russian thought and literature are repeatedly preoccupied with problems relating to the awakening of Russian national self-awareness, the growth of Russian culture and the problem of Russia's national destiny. This course will examine the works of Russian thinkers, essayists and literary artists, analyzed in-depth rather than in an eclectic manner. In particular, the course will explore the unique character of Russia's historical experience and improve students' understanding of the emerging "Russian Idea" in contrast to Western European civilization.

307 History of Africa to 1885
History of the Great Civilizations of Ancient Africa. This course covers all the major kingdoms and civilizations that developed in Africa from the earliest times up to the era of the colonial period. The civilizations to be included in this course are: Ancient Egypt, Kingdoms of Nubia and Axum, Ancient Ghana, Songhay, Mali, the Ancient Kingdom of the Congo, the Great Zimbabwe civilization and the Zulu Kingdom.

308 History of Africa Since 1885
African responses to European Imperialism. This course examines the concept of European Imperialism and the facts that led to the partition of Africa by European powers in the latter part of the nineteenth century. It also examines the character of colonial rule and its ultimate overthrow in Africa. The course will also examine the post-independence period and the various ideological postures of the independent states will be analyzed.

309 United States Intellectual History
The main trends in the growth of American thought, from the Puritans in the Seventeenth Century through the naturalism and pragmatism of the late nineteenth century, are treated in this course. Demand will determine availability.

312 Urban History of the United States
This course covers the rise and development of the city and of urban life in the United States from the earliest beginnings to the present.

313-314 Diplomatic History of the United States
This course traces the major developments in foreign policy and diplomacy from the time of the American Revolution to the present.

315-316 The Third Republic in France
This course will be concerned with the politics and society of France during the Third Republic. Important historical themes such as industrialization, the gradual democratization of the society, the conflict between church and state and the rise of political parties will be examined. Attention will also be given tot he major intellectual currents of the period. Such a course will be of benefit not only to History Majors and Minors, but also to French Language Majors and to Political Science majors who wish to study in some detail a country other than their own. The course will be limited to Juniors and Seniors. The instructor may make exceptions to this stipulation.

401-402. Historical Methods
A required course for history majors, the course emphasizes concepts of historical causation, theories of history, basic bibliography and techniques of historical research through assignment of research problems.


 

 

 

 

History Home

History Program Requirements & Courses

History Faculty

Faculty Profiles

Dr. Levi A. Nwachuku

Dr. Stephen McCullough

Dr. D. Zizwe Poe

Dr. Kwambena Nuamah

Mr. Glenn Burns

Dr. Gwinyai P. Muzorewa

 

College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

 

 

 

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1570 Baltimore Pike, P.O. Box 179, Lincoln University, PA 19352
484-365-8000

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