Department of Sociology and Anthropology Criminal Justice Program

SOC 351.01 COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Prerequisite: Intro to Criminal Justice

Instructor: Dr. Zoran Milovanovich

Phone: (484) 365-8000, x3548

Office Location: DH 362

 

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Course examines and compares the legal and criminal justice systems of different nations. It focuses on historical, political and social factors, and explains their influence on legal institutions and systems of justice. Discusses points of divergence between other societies and the United States in perceived causes of crime and differing approaches to rehabilitation and crime prevention. Countries representing Europe, Africa, Asia and Latin America are included.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Upon completion of this course, the student should be able to:

         To expand knowledge and develop a better understanding of other countries and their cultures.

         Identify and explain the differences and similarities of their own and other criminal justice systems.

         Develop curiosity and imagination and put into question the soundness of the solutions, institutions and many other aspects of their criminal justice system.

         Recognize that every legal and criminal justice system is the product of different intertwining and interacting historical, socioeconomic and cultural factors.

         Develop the ability to use Internet resources for the purpose of acquiring relevant knowledge about different countries.

 COURSE REQUIREMENTS:

         Internet research;

         Class presentation;

         Classroom attendance and participation;

         Tests: four tests, including midterm and final exam.

METHOD OF EVALUATION

Grade Distribution

Quiz

15%

Midterm Exam

25%

Final Exam

40%

Oral Presentation

15%

Class Participation

5%

 

Oral Presentation

For detailed instructions how to prepare your oral presentation, click here.

Evaluation of the oral presentation is based on the following criteria: selection of subject (relevant to assignment, interesting, appropriate level); content and organization (necessary components: introduction, development, supporting material, conclusion); language (clarity, vividness, grammar correct, oral style); delivery (body control, voice); attitude toward an audience (urge to communicate); the degree to which the class was involved; and overall effectiveness.

Percentage to Letter-Grade Conversions

A

95-99%

A-

91-94%

B+

86-90%

B

81-85%

B-

76-80%

C+

71-75%

C

66-70%

C-

61-65%

D+

56-60%

D

51-55%

F

0-50%

 

Tests

Students are expected to take all tests at the regularly scheduled time. If a student cannot do so, he/she should inform the professor before the test. If the reason for being absent is valid, the student will be given the opportunity to take a make-up test. Because of the difficulty of developing a second test, make-up test will consist entirely of essay questions. Students who miss test without informing the professor beforehand will not be permitted to make up the test unless they can provide proof of having had to leave the campus unexpectedly for a hospital stay or serious family emergency.

Attendance

Students in this class will be expected to adhere to the University regulations on absence from class. Students are advised to keep in mind that four absences may result in an automatic failure in the course, and that two tardy arrivals will be counted as one absence.

Academic Ethics:

Students are reminded that they must adhere to the standards of academic ethics of the University. These include standards of honesty for such activities as submitting assignments and essays, taking tests and examinations and doing project assignments. To view the full text of the University Approved Integrity Statement, click here.

REQUIRED TEXT:

Reichel, Philip, COMPARATIVE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMS, Prentice Hall,

COURSE OUTLINE

 AN INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE JUSTICE SYSTEMS

 CRIME ON THE WORLD SCENE

 AN AMERICAN PERSPECTIVE ON CRIMINAL LAW

 LEGAL TRADITIONS

 SUBSTANTIVE LAW AND PROCEDURAL LAW IN MAJOR LEGAL TRADITIONS

 AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON POLICING

 AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON COURTS

 AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON CORRECTIONS

 AN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE ON JUVENILE JUSTICE

INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL JUSTICE WEB SITES

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Go to Requirements for Criminal Justice Majors

Go to Suggested Course Sequence for Criminal Justice Majors

Go to Requirements for a Criminal Justice Minor

Email: milovanovich@lu.lincoln.edu